International Golf needs to return to Jamaica’s shores

By Zaheer E. Clarke

Published January 23, 2017

Jamaica, once a mainstay on the international golf circuit, has not hosted an international golf tournament in over 20 years. International golf desperately needs to return to Jamaica’s shores if Jamaica is going to maximise its sports tourism potential.

Ernie Els (right) is seen pulling a donkey across the Tryall Golf Course at the 1994 Johnnie Walker World Golf Championship. (Photo credit: Unknown)

Ernie Els (right) is seen pulling a donkey across the Tryall Golf Course at the 1994 Johnnie Walker World Golf Championship.
(Photo credit: Unknown)

Years ago as a youngster, I watched ‘The Big Easy’ better known as Ernie Els bring his easy and laid-back style to the shores of Jamaica, in what was then, the richest golf tournament in the world, the Johnnie Walker World Golf Championship. He drove and putted his way to the 1994 World Championship title at age 25 on the fairways and greens of the Tryall Golf Club. His imposing six-foot-three-inch South African frame, almost as if still asleep, slumbered across the golf course, making ridiculous shot after ludicrous shot, as he secured his first world championship title by six strokes over Mark McCumber and former champion Nick Faldo.

In 35 events that year, across five continents, he captured five titles, 16 top-five finishes, and 19 top-10 finishes. Unsurprisingly, he was also crowned the 1994 PGA Rookie of the Year title. This white South African became a black boy’s favourite player all because he won this golf tournament in his homeland. This black boy has been hooked on golf ever since. Continue reading

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TEF donates 93 million to golf

By Zaheer E. Clarke

Published on January 18, 2017

Godfrey Dyer reveals that the Tourism Enhancement Fund (TEF) has contributed over 93 million Jamaican dollars to develop and sponsor golf in Jamaica over the past two years.

Chairman of the Tourism Enhancement Fund, Godfrey Dyer, is pleased with the outcome of the Jamaica Open golf tournament (Photo: Zaheer E. Clarke)

Chairman of the Tourism Enhancement Fund, Godfrey Dyer, is pleased with the outcome of the Jamaica Open golf tournament
(Photo: Zaheer E. Clarke)

Godfrey Dyer, the chairman of the Tourism Enhancement Fund (TEF), revealed at the 2017 Jamaica Open golf tournament at the Half Moon Golf Club that the TEF has contributed 93 million Jamaican dollars over the past two years to the development and sponsorship of golf in Jamaica.

In an exclusive interview with ZFLS, Dyer claimed that individuals have alluded in the past that the TEF has not paid enough attention to the sponsorship of golf. However, he mentioned that in the past 24 months, the TEF has assisted with the improvement of several golf courses across the island and the sponsorship of the 2017 Jamaica Open golf tournament. Continue reading

UK’s Paul Eales narrowly wins the Jamaican Open

By Zaheer E. Clarke

Published on January 16, 2017

The 2017 Jamaica Open golf champion, Paul Eales hoists the sterling silver championship trophy after winning the 50th staging of the tournament by one shot over the 1993 champion Tom Gillis (Photo: Zaheer E. Clarke)

The 2017 Jamaica Open golf champion, Paul Eales hoists the sterling silver championship trophy after winning the 50th staging of the tournament by one shot over the 1993 champion Tom Gillis
(Photo: Zaheer E. Clarke)

In an exciting finish, United Kingdom’s Paul Eales won the 50th staging of Jamaica Open golf tournament by one-shot at the Half Moon Golf Course last Saturday.

Despite scoring a three over par 75 on the final day, Eales held off the persistent challenge of 1993 Jamaica Open champion Tom Gillis as the tournament went down to the last hole of the 54-hole golf tournament. Continue reading

Cricket returns to Trelawny Stadium

By Zaheer E. Clarke

Published January 16, 2017

The Trelawny Multi-purpose Stadium hosted warm-up matches and the opening ceremony of the 2007 ICC Cricket World Cup. Thereafter, it hosted its first international matches, two ODI games in 2016 between West Indies Women and England Women.

The Trelawny Multi-purpose Stadium hosted warm-up matches and the opening ceremony of the 2007 ICC Cricket World Cup. Thereafter, it hosted its first set of international matches in 2016, two ODI games between West Indies Women and England Women.

 

The Pakistan cricket team will be playing a three-day match at the under-utilized Trelawny Multipurpose Stadium on Saturday, April 15, 2017.

The three-day match is part of the scheduled 2017 Pakistani tour of the West Indies which comprises two Twenty20 Internationals, three One-Day Internationals and three Test matches.

The series will commence on March 31 with the first of two T20Is at West Indies’s largest capacity cricket ground, Queens Park Oval, in carnival crazy Trinidad. The second T20I will be held two days later on April 2. Continue reading

Who are cricket’s great and not-so-great walls?

By Zaheer E. Clarke

Published January 16, 2017, in the Western Mirror.

A purely statistical look at the batsmen who were the hardest and easiest to dismiss in Test cricket.

Shivnarine Chanderpaul has batted over 1000 minutes between dismissals on four occasions in his career. No other batsman has done it more than twice. © WICB

Shivnarine Chanderpaul batted for over 1000 minutes between dismissals on four occasions in his career. No other batsman has done it more than twice.
© WICB

Three weeks ago, a few of my friends engaged me in a debate about batsmen who were a menace for teams in Test cricket. This were players who once they walked from the pavilion to the middle, teams knew that it would require extreme luck and/or enormous skill to make them return – and even sometimes, with all that, nothing seemed to work. These were players who displayed yogic powers of concentration at the crease and treasured their wickets above all else.

The intense discussions had several cricket lovers nominating their favourite yeoman-like players and describing their invaluable service to their respective teams. Names bandied about include retired players such as Australia’s Steve Waugh and Allan Border, West Indies’ Shivnarine Chanderpaul and Jimmy Adams, India’s Rahul “The Wall” Dravid and Sunil Gavaskar, South Africa’s Jacques Kallis, and the England’s Geoffrey Boycott. In addition to those retired, players of current vintage were also mentioned, including South Africa’s Faf du Plessis and Hashim Amla and Pakistan’s Younus Khan. Continue reading