To the Bradman Assassinators

By Zaheer E. Clarke

Published October 26, 2015

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Sir Donald Bradman. The ‘god’ of all batsmen to play Test and first-class cricket. He has a Test average of 99.94 and a first class average of 95. Next best averages in Test cricket are in the 60s.

In the past 10 months, I have written two chiding yet detailed exposés to self-proclaimed cricket experts on the meaning of terms in cricket. This approach to educating the lost and nescient is not my preferred approach, but one borne out of frustration, and used seasonally and hopefully, tenderly. Nonetheless, I find myself writing another article because of these so-called cricket experts’ and fans’ tortuous reasoning, cooked-up facts, blatant lies, and invented statistics about cricket’s greatest and most recognizable figure, Sir Donald Bradman.

Edmund Burke once said,  “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” As one who has a degree in Bradmanology, I think it’s time to speak after patiently listening to all the myths, lies, and convoluted statistics from the Bradman antagonists. If I remain silent any longer, their assassination attempt on Bradman’s invulnerable reputation might seemingly prevail to the unknowing public. Continue reading

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The Other Side of Life and Sports

By Zaheer E. Clarke

Published October 21, 2015, in the Jamaica Observer

Khloe Kardashian (left) and Lamar Odom

Khloe Kardashian (left) and Lamar Odom

THERE is no greater feeling than triumph. Accomplishing a goal against unspeakable odds can feel surreal, enchanting and even spiritual. The feeling when you hit that last-second shot in the deciding game to win the championship, or when you gallop and lunge to nip your opponent at the line for gold and glory can be addictive and intoxicating. It’s a feeling sportsmen and sportswomen yen to experience and hope to duplicate multiple times during their careers.

In the world of work, nailing that contract or presentation, or pulling the proverbial ‘rabbit out of the hat’ on a project, brings similar sentiments and Muhammad Ali chants of “I must be the greatest.” On the other hand, failing to surmount these Herculean feats often brings a sense of sadness and is equated to mental weakness by others. And, for some individuals, doing unimaginable feats brings no sense of accomplishment or joy; ironically, only pain and numbness. Continue reading

FIFA Scandal Part 3: The Mafia-esque Administration Has Fallen

FIFA Scandal Part 3

By Zaheer E. Clarke

Published October 12, 2015

FIFA President Joseph S. Blatter, left, UEFA President Michel Platini, center, and FIFA Secretary General Jerome Valcke, right, are engaged in conversation during the 65th FIFA Congress held at the Hallenstadion in Zurich, Switzerland, Friday, May 29, 2015. (Walter Bieri/Keystone via AP)

FIFA President Joseph S. Blatter (left), UEFA President Michel Platini (center) and FIFA Secretary General Jerome Valcke (right) are engaged in conversation during the 65th FIFA Congress held at the Hallenstadion in Zurich, Switzerland, Friday, May 29, 2015. (Walter Bieri/Keystone via AP)

In Sicilian crime families, there is an organizational structure. A boss or don is the head of the crime family. His second in command or future successor is the underboss, and his advisor or counselor often acts as his consigliere. These three comprise the Administration, or the ruling panel in the crime family.

Last week, the Mafia-esque administration of the most popular worldwide sport, football, was disbarred by its Ethics Committee. Sepp Blatter, the boss or don of FIFA for over 17 years; his purported favourite son, future successor or underboss, FIFA Vice President Michael Platini; and general secretary of FIFA, Jérôme Valcke, Blatter’s consigliere or ‘fixer’, were all provisionally suspended for 90 days for alleged ethical breaches. The Ethics Committee stated that the suspensions could be extended a further 45 days while investigations continue. Are there ethics among Mafia lords? It would appear so. Continue reading

The More Things Change, The More They Remain The Same

By Zaheer E. Clarke

 (Published October 5, 2015)

West Indies coach Phil Simmons and Convenor of Selectors, Clive Lloyd have been at the centre of the latest conundrum in West Indies cricket. Photo: Jason O’Brien/Action Images/Livepic

West Indies coach Phil Simmons and Convenor of Selectors, Clive Lloyd have been at the centre of the latest conundrum in West Indies cricket. Photo: Jason O’Brien/Action Images/Livepic

A few months ago in an article, I listed the subtly glaring personnel changes occurring in West Indies cricket. In the past 15 months, the Convenor (Chairman) of Selectors and the panel, the head coach, the captain, and the bandit of players representing West Indies have all changed, but not the West Indies Cricket Board President, Dave Cameron and his board.

However, in the past 15 years we have had several board presidents and a high turnover-like carousel of board members. Yet, with all these changes, West Indies record against the top-7 teams in world cricket hasn’t registered a pulse. Continue reading